Awakening Potentials: Where Narrative and Music Meet

Stalemate. Deadlock. Impasse. A never ending or changing reality. Hopelessness.

Upon facing insurmountable challenges run into the ground ten times over by proposed solution after proposed solution to no avail, then what? Game over? Or seek awakening potentials?

Music as a creative process is an ever expanding and evolving medium. It preserves the past by conjuring it in the present, while steadfastly proposing new boundaries to cross and explore.  Unprecedented musical ideas seen as nouveau eventually become standardized into the global repertoire perpetuated by YouTube and SoundCloud to name a few. The facilitation of music to engender premises which did not exist before awakens potentials that become possible for the first time. Awakening potentials substantiate the promise of new creations, relationships, beginnings, and imaginations.

Join me in moving from theory to practice by examining awakening potentials existent in the sharing and exploration of childhood sing-a-longs.

During childhood, we are taught short sing-a-longs connected to our identity, whether rooted in our culture, religion, or nationality, that support the story we come to know as our personal narrative. Though I could pick several childhood sing-a-longs as example, I will choose a personal childhood sing-a-long, the Hebrew song Yesh Li Pajamas, in English “I Have Pajamas.” The song goes like this:

Yesh li, yesh li pajamas.    
I have, I have pajamas.
Yesh li, yesh li pajamas.
I have, I have pajamas.
Yesh li pajamas be’cachol, lavan, cachol, lavan, cachol, lavan.
I have pajamas that are blue, white, blue, white, blue, white.
Cmo’ degel Israel. 
Like the flag of Israel.
 

Though simply written, the purpose of this childhood song is to create a sense of personal attachment and belonging to the State of Israel. The song is not expressly political in that there is no mention of borders or history, yet unquestioningly there is an underlying directive of nationality enshrouded in the colors blue and white.

Let’s examine another childhood song of a differing narrative.

I like the colors. I’m an artist child.
Painting with white, black, red. I like the colors.
Painting with blue, yellow, green. I’m an artist child.
What does “red” refer to? To the flowers. What does “green” refer to? To the trees. What does “white” refer to? To the snow.
I like, I like, I like… I like the colors. I’m an artist child.
Painting with white, black, red. I like the colors.
Painting with blue, yellow, green. I’m an artist child.
What does “blue” refer to? To the sky.
What does “black” refer to? To the goats.
What does “yellow” refer to? To the bananas.
Pink for flowers and silver for moons. Gold for sand and brown for mountains.
I’m painting the most beautiful painting with colors. It makes me feel happy. 
 

This childhood sing-a-long is a composition of the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music headquartered in Ramallah. As I am not Palestinian, I cannot interpret the Palestinian narrative with the same exactness and truth as a Palestinian. If I may though, I would point out the many nature and agricultural references describing a landscape, a place, or a land. There is a recognition and connection to what could only be described as items present in a local scenery. From the flowers and the snow to the goats and mountains, the colors are what one would use to describe these items from their window, field, or garden.

We feel pride in our allegiances, which support our personal narrative and complete our desire for community. Deciding whether or not we share our allegiances or possessions with others outside our community is where conflict can arise. Is it a question of tolerance or compassion? Do we feel our survival or traditions are threatened by sharing that allegiance or possession?  It may be hard to even begin that discussion without the actualization of a platform, which did not exist before, where awakening potentials stir.

In the case of these two childhood songs each based in a differing narrative, where can awakening potentials stir? After introducing each song by singing or playing the melody on an instrument and then explaining  its lyrics and references, see what new songs can be created using elements originating from both sing-a-longs. What is similar? Both songs focus on using colors to identify or characterize symbols of nationality from flag to the description of land. What is different? The actual melodies of the songs are different, yet there still are musical elements in both that are similar. What would happen if you and your partner decided to change the rhythm, add a B section, use the traditional instruments of both cultures in its instrumentation, modulate, add another verse, etc. The possibilities are endless, and yet it is still possible to preserve original elements of both sing-a-longs.

After experimenting with all of the various ways both songs can coexist, separately yet together, modified yet the same, a platform which did not exist before can now support an even deeper discussion of why these childhood sing-a-longs are so important to each individual.  What do they signify of the past and what can they elude to in the future?

Decide for yourself and see what awakening potentials you can find that facilitate in actualizing what did not exist before, such as a new song, a greater understanding and trust, and even the beginning of a new friendship.

I attempt to cite all of the sources used in my writings and research as correctly as possible, so please adopt the same policy toward the works presented here and as well my own writings by citing this blog’s findings correctly. This blog is meant for sharing, not plagiarism. Thank you for your respect.

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1. Edward Said National Music Conservatory. Palestinian Children’s Songs. Edward Said National Music Conservatory, 2010. YouTube. 30 May 2010. Web. 31 May 2012. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCtvoVsxteE&gt;.

2. Lederach, John Paul. The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2005. Print.